Internships – How to Find Them and How to Get One

How to find an internship is a subject of great interest to students; internships  are a great path to getting a job offer!

Internships can result in you gaining great experience as well as being a stepping stone to your first post-college job!

internship-1How do you find them? They are rarely advertised because organizations don’t need to…..employers that offer internships – paid and unpaid – are often swamped with correspondence from students seeking to work for the summer as well as referrals from friends and family.

Many colleges and universities build internships  into their curriculum and that might be a consideration when you are choosing where to go to school … or where to transfer.

What we are going to focus on here is unearthing internships that are not part of a school’s program.

There are several ways to unearth internships…and then be considered for them.

1. Ask fellow students where they and their friends have worked as interns in the past. Ask them to ask their parents where internship opportunities might be found. Ask your school guidance counselor. Have your parents ask their friends and peers the same question.

In other words, mine friends and family for leads.

2. Make a bunch of telephone calls. Call organizations in your general area of interest… with a prepared script. If you are studying accounting with an eye to be an accountant your script might be:

Hello. My name is Robb Mulberger and I am studying accounting at American University. When I graduate I will be looking for a job as a staff accountant. In the meantime I am searching for internships where I can both learn as well as contribute. Does your firm have internships?

If “Yes” then proceed to see how you would apply.

If “No” then thank them, ask if they have any leads for you and proceed to make more calls.

If you make enough calls, you WILL unearth an internship opportunity!

Paid vs Unpaid? – unless the finances absolutely don’t permit it… an unpaid internship that is meaningful is better than any of the standard summer jobs (lifeguard, camp counselor, waiter, etc.). It is much more impressive on your resume, can be a great learning experience and can often lead to getting a job offer upon graduation.

When do you begin the process of seeking an internship. Summer ones are usually locked up by Christmas… so start the process in the fall for the following summer.

For more info regarding internnships check out this University of Iowa post.

Note – when you do land an internship, you are entering the adult world. Dress for it and act accordingly!

Good luck!

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For jobs and career opportunities in the Washington, DC metro area –  visit the NRI website. Many jobs are listed there …..and NRI Recruiters can find others for you!

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Copyright © Robert Mulberger All Rights Reserved

Getting a Job Offer – Avoiding a LinkedIn Pitfall!

Getting a Job Offer – Avoiding a LinkedIn Pitfall!

Let’s talk about LinkedIn photos.  For starters, make sure you have one.  When you reach out to a prospective employer,  they are going to do a Google search on your name and iterations of it; e.g. – Robert Mulberger AND Robb Mulberger AND Bob Mulberger. Your social media profiles speak as to who you are. Look at your LinkedIn  profile.  If you don’t have a picture the employer may feel like you have something to hide.  You don’t, so don’t make prospective employers feel that way. 

Any old photo won’t work.  Make sure you have a good professional picture that wasn’t from a wedding, and where you aren’t cropping out your significant other.  I hope it goes without saying that your significant other shouldn’t be in the picture.  Nor should your dog.  Or your cat.  Or an alcoholic beverage.  And no “selfies”! friendly eye contactMake sure it’s a professional picture. Friendly warm smile. Here is an example of a good picture/smile…as well as one that doesn’t tripangry eye contact the “he looks like a nice guy” meter!

Remember, a picture is worth a thousand words and you don’t want yours to cost you thousands of dollars by ruling you out of a possible job offer!

 Follow me on Twitter for notices of these posts.

 For jobs and career opportunities in the Washington, DC metro area –  visit the NRI website. Many jobs are listed there …..and NRI Recruiters can find others for you!

 follow me on twitter   My LinkedIn profile   

Copyright © Robert Mulberger All Rights Reserved

Interviewing Preparation – Critical to Getting a Job Offer

Interviewing Preparation – Critical to Getting a Job Offer

Yes – getting a job offer is indeed is a competitive affair.

Just as your organization, division, department, etc. has goals and objectives…. you should too have a personal development plan.

If an interviewer asks “what have your learned this past year that makes you a good hire for us?… last three years”?…you need to have a good answer. And “good” translates to something or things specific, and measurable. Let’s face it – interviewing well is an important step to getting a job offer!

Management expert and author Tom Peters of “In Search of Excellence” fame (a great book by the way –  a must read in my opinion) offers a short laundry list of questions and statements to address so as to create and implement a personal development plan.

  1. I am really good at (list one – three things here). By this time next year I can add (one – two things here).
  2. The most valuable things I have learned in the past six months are (list one – three things… they can be skills learned, information gained or things you learned about yourself to make you a better person and/or a more productive employee).
  3. I am going to (be more active in an organization –  spend more time in the gym – lose “x” pounds – read “x” book that has been sitting on my bedside table for a year or more – etc.). Detail here a favorable action you are going to take.
  4. I am going to reach out to renew my  contact with (one – three names); see if I can’t set up a lunch or coffee with each of them.
  5. I will mark my calendar to do this exercise again in six months.

As you compile things from Q 1& 2 above… find a way to include them in a revised resume as well as update your LinkedIn, etc. profiles so that they and your resume are in sync.

Getting a job offer is a competitive process… do your thinking and preparation to be able to give a great answer to the question “what have your learned this past year that makes you a good hire for us?… last three years”?

You can find much more information about interview preparation in Chapter 8 (Interviewing – The Bridge Between you and Your Next Job) of The Ultimate Job-Seeker’s Guide.

Follow me on Twitter for notices of these posts.

For jobs and career opportunities in Washington, DC – visit the NRI website – many jobs are listed there – and NRI Recruiters can find others for you!

follow me on twitter   My LinkedIn profile  

Copyright © Robert Mulberger All Rights Reserved