4 Tips to Successfully Start a New Job!

4 Tips to Successfully Start a New Job!

Top 4Just as there is “only one first impression”…so it is with starting a new job. Start off poorly and you will at best be playing catch-up. You wrote and re-wrote your resume, you interviewed  successfully and accepted a job offer. There is still much to do to leverage that job offer into the next step towards a successful career!!

Print this blog post and carry it with you as you begin your new job. Refer to the 4 tips and be sure you follow them!!

1. Introduce yourself to everyone. Especially those in other departments that you run into in the cafeteria, parking lot, hallways, etc. With the same confident smile and handshake you used during all of your interviews. Have an introductory statement “Hi – my name is Robb Mulberger and I am the new controller  here at XYZ.” Make note of their name and ask where they work in the organization if it is not offered. As soon as you can write it down – in fact you can do it right on the spot with the comment “I have met so many new people here – I want to jot down your name to help me get acclimated!” Enter all of these into your contact list but also prepare a typed “cheat sheet” you will carry with you until you know who is who. Always address people by their names – “Hi Bill”…or “Good morning Susan” – not just a simple “Good morning” –  it will impress folks that you took the time to remember their name, especially those you don’t interact with on a regular basis!

2. Be organized. I use Outlook’s calendar feature synced to my iPhone. I make liberal use of the “alert” feature when adding an appointment or task via my iPhone (“reminder” on your PC’s Outlook access) to prevent me forgetting an appointment or pre-determined action to be taken (make a phone call, mail a document, etc.). I also print the Outlook calendar month-by-month for six months and carry it in my briefcase . On it I pencil in appointments since it was printed as I enter them either via my PC or iPhone. Never throw away past months – keep them as a diary of past events. The objective is to be really organized and never miss a task. Get up to speed with your employer’s internal communications processes (email, tele systems, etc.).

3. Create a job reference manual. In addition to the “cheat sheet” list of names and job responsibility you created, make note of other helpful pieces of information such as your new company’s website and site map to find employee information, mission statement, etc. During the interview and hiring process you no doubt determined how you would be evaluated and what the definition of success in your job is. Write this down in bold ….burn it into your brain… so as you go about your job you are focused on what is important to your success.

4. Listen more than you talk … at least during your first few months on the job. Be sure you know the “lay of the land” before you offer any opinions. Few things are more of a turn-off than a new person becoming a know-it-all! Listen and learn how things are done before you chime in.

OK… 4 tips to successfully starting a new job. Follow them and you will get off to a good start to career success!

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“On-Boarding” Yourself – Avoiding the Mistakes that New Hires Can Make!

A procedure followed by most organizations when someone new is hired is to go through an “On-Boarding process – a process  to get the new hire oriented and off to a good and solid start.

Let’s talk about the sales-onboarding-Sales-Management-Workshop-300x213process of you On-Boarding yourself to avoid some common mistakes new hires can make!!

Just as first impression count – so do mistakes and displays of poor judgment during your first months on the job. After time – you will figure it out – or you will be gone! The key is to have a roadmap of do’s and don’ts to follow from day one.

  1. Dress and act on day one as you did for your interviews – day one on the job is still “show time”. As is week one and month one! Dress and act accordingly. Over the first several weeks – take measure of how people dress, how informal or formal is the culture. Adjust gradually as may be appropriate…but don’t be on the cutting edge – don’t dress to match the most casual or to mirror the most informal of those you work with. What you don’t want to do is to stand out in this regard!
  2. Pay attention to processes and procedures – take notes as may be needed. You may be given some written manuals or instructions as to certain aspects of your job. If not – take notes as things are described and/or as you are trained. What you don’t want to do is to require repetitive briefings on procedures and processes you could have captured in writing for future reference as needed!
  3. Sweat the small stuff. Operate in an error-free mode. Check your work and proofread.  You want to be – and be thought of – as a “Go-To” person. Those people don’t make mistakes – and if they do – they only make them once!  A great mindset I encourage everyone to adopt is “Do each and every task – no matter how small – with the skill, precision and efficiency of which you can be justly proud”. If you are asked to do some menial work – do it and do it in a first-class matter. It will be noticed.
  4. Minimize (truly!)  the social networking/media/texting, etc.  while on the job. First of all – when in a meeting or in a conversation – NEVER check emails or see what triggered the sound announcing an incoming whatever (news flash, text, etc.). It is just plain rude! Check email and respond to texts, etc. during breaks – not while you are focusing on the work at hand. Constant checking and responding breaks your focus on your work …and your inattention to the work at hand will be noticed!
  5. Avoid engaging in an office romance. They rarely end well, are NEVER a secret, can be very disruptive to morale. And if you do – against this advice – NEVER do so with a boss or subordinate… that is a job-losing course of action! And if you do – against this advice – NEVER do so while new on the job – don’t treat your workplace in such a cavalier manner!

Only you are responsible to manage your career…and that responsibility begins fresh each time you take a new job. Whether or not your new employer has an On-Boarding process for you to follow , set one up for yourself using these guidelines. Devise and manage your own On-Boarding process – one that will avoid job-ending mistakes! Good luck!

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