5 Very Positive Things that Successful People Do!

5 Very Positive Things that Successful People Do!

thumbs up“I’ve missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. 26 times I’ve been trusted to take the winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.” Michael Jordan

Successful people have developed very powerful and deeply held habits.

Here are 5 of them:

1. They live for the future and they don’t dwell in the past. They learn from mistakes and errors but they never brood over “what could have been.” Successful people know that the past is history and that taking risks involves the possibility of failure…but taking reasonable risks is also necessary to succeed.

2. They don’t obsess over perfection. It is not attainable in any measurable way and making perfection the objective is a Sisyphean task and sets one up for failure. Successful people are realistic in their goal-setting and apply themselves and do the best they can. When the job or task is done…it’s time to move on. History will judge if it was good enough.

3. They associate with successful people. And avoid people who are “downers” …those who are negative. Just as a positive attitude is contagious, so is a negative attitude. Negative people can poison a team or an organization. Putting up with negative people is a waste of time and energy that can be used to build positive relationships and networks. Associating with winners helps people become winners themselves. You can’t pick all you interact with … but you sure can for a lot of them. If you are a supervisor – don’t tolerate it in any of your reports. If you supervise supervisors, instruct your people to not tolerate it and train them how to eliminate it from their domain.

4. They never stop learning. Successful people learn on two different tracks: first, studying the components of success and failure and secondly learning more about what interests them personally. The first one is the same for all successful people; learning what the dynamics of success are, how to achieve them as well as learning from past mistakes. One way to do so is to study the success and failures of others. What were the habits, practices, mindsets, and strengths of the great successes of history; Winston Churchill, George Washington, Andrew Carnegie (Carnegie Steel that became U.S. Steel),  Steve Jobs (Apple), Jack Welch (GE)…and Michael Jordan, to name just a few. These great success also made mistakes – big ones along the way. Learn from these greats.

The second area of learning will also make you a more interesting and personable person! In my case, it is history – especially of the American Civil War and the two World Wars. My two universes of learning are therefore reading  biographies and military history. The lessons to be learned overlap. Every now and then, however, an Elmore Leonard novel sneaks in!

5. They bring a healthy amount of skepticism to the table when it is appropriate. They have a bit of “Missouri” in them – Missouri being the “show me state”. It helps them separate the “wheat from the chaff” – the useful from the not-so-useful when absorbing information or needing to decide a course of action. The world is full of people with agendas. A certain amount of skepticism helps to get through that minefield. They know not to take things at face value without probing the details and understanding the consequences of the action being considered. They challenge claims that just don’t seem to make sense.

Step back mentally and evaluate how well  you do in these five dynamics. Make them part of your personal planning journal and incorporate them into daily thinking. Good luck!

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Where Can I Find Job-Seeking Resources in my Area?

The following is another question asked following the webinar I did for the alumni of Georgetown University entitled “Resumes, Interviewing and the World of Work” along with my response:

Hi Robb!

Thanks so much for the interviewing and resume seminar. I live in the Denver, CO area and wonder if you have any recruitment services you can recommend to me in this area.

Many thanks!

Glad it was of value!

I suggest three approaches to finding a staffing service in your area that can be of service to you.

ASA webFirst – go to www.americanstaffing.net – the website of the American Staffing Association. Go to the “Job Seekers” tab and take it from there to find several staffing services in your area of experience/expertise as well as in the Denver area.

The second thing is to talk to friends and business contacts and ask them which staffing services they have used in the past and get their feedback.

Third – regardless of how you come up with a staffing service or two to consider working with – vet them. I cover in great detail how to do so in my book, but essentially you want to “interview” them as to their ability to be of service to YOU!

Ask such questions as:

  • How long has your firm been in business?
  • How long have you been a recruiter?
  • I am looking for a position as a controller or accounting manager. How many orders like that have you personally filled in the past year? How about your firm?
  • How many people work in your firm?

You get the idea!!

For further information, buy my book and read Chapter Six – “How to Best Use a Staffing Service Company/Headhunter” (shameless book pitch!!)

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Enough is Enough!! Stop Talking and Let’s Get on With It !!

stop_talking_tshirtA major annoyance for most of us is a conversation with someone that never stops talking!

You almost have to wait until they take a breath to get a comment or question in!

Learning how and when to “shut up” is both a behavioral habit as well as a leadership trait.

According to  Mike Staver of The Staver Group – www.thestavergroup.com – many people don’t know when to talk and when to put a brake on it.

Here are a few questions to determine whether you know how to keep your mouth shut or not:

  •  After you make your point, do you just have to add a few other (unnecessary) comments?
  •  Do you say “in closing” several times before you really close?
  •  Do you have to have the last word in an argument or disagreement?

Here are some communications tips from Staver:

  •  Be clear about what you are attempting to communicate.
  •  Share with the person you are communicating with what you want to accomplish.
  •  Avoid getting distracted by other issues, ideas, points, stories, etc. (I refer to this as “wandering around the verbal landscape”! With folks that do this, you just want to scream “Stick to the point”!!)
  •  Use “talk-ending” techniques such as “So what are the next steps?” or use an example to wrap things up.
  •  Learn to tolerate silence. It is effective…and it won’t kill you, Staver says!

“Leadership – never stop learning”

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Your First 90 Days on the Job

I wrote earlier about four critical things you must do when you start a new job (July 17 ‘13 post).

90-day-plan-300x206To recap:

1. Figure out who the key players are in your arena…and spend serious face time with them.

2. Determine how you will be evaluated.

3. Determine what the really important things are.

4. Be on the way to becoming a “Go To” person.

They are critical and should be your first priority…but there a few other very important things  you need to pay attention to during the critical “break-in” period….your first 90 days on the job.

1. Create a personal game plan…. and update it weekly. This personal game plan will be very short term initially… you can’t make plans for what you don’t know (yet). It is essentially a “To Do/To Follow Up On” list broken into groups – the groups being different direct reports (subordinates), different projects, different things you are waiting for something to come back your way for additional action, etc.

Although there are all sorts of online and smartphone/PC applications for such things, I have always preferred to keep this very simple – an 8 ½ x 11 lined pad with pages devoted to each “group”. Makes it easy to refer and write to it day and night. The top sheet is blank except for my name and tele # and a request to get it to me if found – it is really important to me… and while I have never lost one… that doesn’t mean I won’t someday <smile>!

Just label each page as to who/what it applies to…when full… go the next blank page. Number the pages by group.

Much of it will truly be “To Do/To Follow Up On” things.. but the reason I reference it as a “game plan” is that it will also have a series of personal objectives there as well. I use a few sheets at the very end of the pad to jot them down and update/revise as necessary.

By putting it all on one pad, it is easy to stay on top of your entire breadth of responsibilities…and it goes with your everywhere! And when it is full – don’t throw it away for a year or so… you might be surprised to see how often you go back and refer to it.

Finally – due to the nature of what you have recorded here – you need to safeguard it very carefully!!

2. Create a reference guide…and update it as frequently as daily. This is a continuing list of “stuff” you will refer to from time to time – such things as procedures, names , tele numbers and email addresses, driving directions, tax ID #s, important deadline dates for whatever  – you get the idea – the stuff you don’t want to have to look up or ask about a second time.

As of this writing, there is a neat pc program called “Evernote” that can really make life easier in this regard.  http://evernote.com   Install it on your PC and your smart phone.. and synch them. That way you can do data entry and retrieval from either. Of course names with tele numbers, addresses and email addresses go into whatever program your employer has set up – usually Outlook.

3. Get a grip on whatever numbers are important to your sphere of responsibility.

You gotta know the numbers. Sales, margins, costs, profits, percentages, ratios, benchmarks. Whatever is important to the objective of getting it done on time and on (or under!) budget.

Every business has ratios and relationships. For example a friend in the hotel business tells me that she staffs housekeepers based on 14. One housekeeper per 14 rooms to be cleaned. Every sales position has a ratio of contacts to presentations to closes. Find out which ratios are relevant to your job, your department, etc.

4. Determine who the external resources are and establish contact with them.

If your job requires you to deal with others external to your organization, make a point to determine who they are and make contact with them.  They might be customers or vendors. They may be outside resources such as lawyers, accountants, bankers, auditors, etc.

Talk to your boss to determine who they might be and be pro-active by reaching out to them. Introduce yourself and let them know they can count on your for whatever role has been the norm in the past.

OK… you now have some guidelines and marching orders for your first 90 days in your new job!

Feel free to post here for the benefit of others your thoughts and ideas you have found successful in this regard!! Thanks!!

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Taking Charge When Taking Over

Taking Charge When Taking Over

Where to begin when you are hired to be the boss??

take_charge

By Marshall Brown, CPCC, President Marshall Brown & Associates. Published in Association TRENDS. Reprinted with permission. While this specifically is geared to a trade association executive, the issues are the same that need to be addressed when a manager at any level is hired to take over an existing team.

Q: I recently became the CEO of a mid-sized association and will be managing a staff of 30. I would like to develop and convey some clear expectations for the staff and give the directors some guidance on implementation. Any tips would be appreciated.

Brown: Too often, executives seem to lead through mental telepathy. Rather than set and communicate clear expectations – the milestones against which we test our progress – they assume their managers and employees know what to do and how to do it. What results is hesitation, indecision and uncertainty. Healthy teamwork, initiative and productivity go out the window.

Properly setting expectations for directors and employees/team members is a critical dimension in quality workplaces, according to a study of managers undertaken in the 1990s by the Gallup Organization. Below are some tips for both you and your directors on setting clear expectations that will set standards for excellence and results:

1. Start with a vision of what you want the end result to look like. Not just what you want done, but the results you want to achieve when the project is completed.

2. Discuss how you define “excellent performance.” Paint a complete picture. Refer to your performance review form. Don’t assume.

3. Focus on the desired outcome, not on describing each and every step. Your goal is to guide, not control. Letting individuals find their own route toward productive outcomes encourages them to use their strengths.

4. Tie the mission of the department to each job. People want to know that their role, whether large or small, makes a difference.

5. Put the expectations in writing.

6. Stay on the sideline. You may be tempted to step in and ‘play the game’ for a subordinate, but if you do, no one will learn.

7. Give feedback, and often! The annual performance review is too late to let staff members know how they are meeting your expectations. Schedule informal review time weekly (quarterly for larger departments). Feedback given along the way sounds more like coaching, not like punishment.

8. Ask for staff members’ feedback on how they think they are doing. Two-way communication clarifies expectations.

9. Give positive reinforcement. Don’t mix negative and positive. Mention the thing you like and you’ll get more of it. Be specific and prompt.

10. Don’t take it personally. When staff members don’t perform as you think they should have, look for solutions, not blame.

This article was originally published in the March 2011 edition of Marshall Brown & Associates’ It’s All About You! Ezine.

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If looking for opportunities in metro Washington, DC – check out NRI’s job listings on our website!

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Four Things You MUST Do When You Start A New Job!

Four Things You MUST Do When You Start A New Job!

first 90 daysGetting “On Board”; What To Do…and Not To Do… in the First 90 days!

OK.. you just started your new job or you will very soon.

Just because you have accepted an offer doesn’t mean  your job search is over!! Part of a successful job search is to become acclimated and begin to make meaningful contributions as quickly as possible. Your objective is to cement key relationships, get the lay of the land and ….make no mistakes.

Have you ever seen a football player on the way to a sure touchdown inexplicably drop the ball….or stumble and fall…or quit running 100% and get tackled? It happens!! In each case, the player quit before the job was done.

Well, your job search isn’t “done” until you are “On Board”!

As the phrase goes “First Impressions Count”…and think of the first impression period to be the first 90 days. Give yourself a maximum of 90 days to:

1. Figure out who the key players are in your arena…and spend serious face time with them. Not so much that you become a pest, of course, but your objective is to really get to know them and where they fit in. Your boss is  one of them of course, but who are the others? Typically, they are those who depend on you for specific assistance or performance on issues and those upon who you likewise depend. Tread cautiously  in conversation; some will be more private than others…and don’t get caught up in company nonsense or politics… but engage them professionally to see what makes them tick.

But beware – it may not end with this group. You need “EA” – “Environmental  Awareness” to know for sure who fits into this category. For example you want to have a good speaking relationship with the security guard, the cashier in the company cafeteria and the main building receptionist. Even though you don’t count on them directly nor they of you – you want them singing your praises!

2. Determine how you will be evaluated. What is the criteria that your boss will grade you on to determine if he or she made a great hire… or an “ok” hire? You should have started this during the interview process. Now that you have been hired, you probably have a pretty good feel for what those criteria are… but regardless, have that conversation with your boss during the first few days on the job.  As the first few weeks roll by confirm that you understood the criteria correctly… and do they reconcile with what you see? Check out the organization’s mission statement. Take the temperature on your performance by scheduling some time with your boss every week or so to ask “How am I doing? ….am I missing anything?…etc.”

3. Determine what the really important things are. And be aware they may not be what they seem to be. Is there an overriding project that senior management is really counting on coming in on time and on budget? Are there major problems or issues to be resolved? Making sure that the “trains run on time” is important, but you need to determine what is #1 on your bosses’ “To Do” list and on his bosses’ “To Do” list as well. You don’t want to be guilty of doing a great job on the mundane, but not really earning your pay by making significant and real contributions to the mission and objectives of your department, your boss and the organization.

4. Be on the way to becoming a “Go To” person. Everywhere of course… but particularly in the areas of greatest importance to the organization. Be curious…see and understand the big picture…pitch in at every opportunity you can to make a difference. Be aware of “turf” issues; always volunteer “Can I give you a hand on this”. And rather than volunteer opinions, ask “Would you like my thoughts on this?” If you see something that doesn’t look quite right – either take care of it… or bring it – diplomatically – to the attention of someone who can take care of it. Being a true “Go To” person requires very good EA (as defined above); you really need to see and be aware of what is going on – both in front of and behind the scenes! Note – this also requires that you do so in an upfront and transparent manner… you are above board at all times!

As a “Go To” person… as time goes on, you will be valued for having been in on the ground floor of past projects, successes, things that didn’t go as expected, etc. It is that collective experience and knowledge that begin to magnify your contributions.

OK… four things to achieve in the first 90 days on the jobwrite them down and post them on where you will see them daily… and then pledge to make progress towards achieving them…daily. Good Luck!

NRI logoCheck out my company’s website blogs and job listings in metro Washington, DC:

www.nri-staffing.com

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Traits of Success!

Traits of success – what do successful people credit for why they have achieved success?

successSuccessful people – when asked, “What has helped you achieve success?” Or ”What are the traits you have nurtured to get where you are?” – will respond with a variety of nouns and descriptive phrases. Some of the most common are detailed below. Take a look at these and check off those that you possess… and add the others to your personal “to do” list.

Do the same for your subordinates and develop a coaching program for each of them so they too can begin to check off as “got it” these desired traits of successful people.

  1. Great and positive attitude. The glass is – at least outwardly – ALWAYS half full. Be “up”…smile…portray that problems and obstacles are to be tackled and resolved. Having a great positive attitude is the first step to being a “Go To” person – a desired state of being for anyone! Have a personal methodology to get and keep your attitude positive, especially when things go wrong. Check the websites and thoughts of Tim Connor  (www.timeconnor.com) , David Rich (www.contagioustalk.com) and Angelo Agrafiotis (www.aaimlifecoaching.com) when you need a mental shot in the arm.
  2. Stay on message. To do otherwise confuses people as to what is important and what the mission is. Repeat the message over and over again… otherwise, people will forget and stray off message. Like the parlor game of telephone where a verbal message is passed down the line and emerges bearing no resemblance to the original message… only by repeating the message will it get to all and be retained in its original form. One memo… one presentation…one speech will never get it done… tenacity is critical.
  3. Be upfront, straightforward and honest…at all times. Simple and direct avoids confusion. No obfuscation…no “blowin’ smoke” about “what’s going on”. Your subordinates and those you work with need to be able to predict how your think and how you make decisions in order to be in sync with you. Being upfront and straightforward leads to predictability. When you use facts and figures – be sure you are right on; getting them wrong leads people to conclude you were playing fast and fancy with the facts.
  4. Be curious. Curiosity leads you and your co-workers to explore new and better ways to do things. It counters the brain “stagnation” that can set in within an organization. Cultivate “environmental awareness” – what is going on around you and – and consider how it all fits in. Read, learn and ponder the “what-ifs” regarding your organization, department or job!
  5. Be a very good listener. When you are talking with someone – give it 100% of your attention. It is just rude to listen and also multi-task on your PDA or let your eyes wander around the room. If you are going to listen to someone, you have two objectives: a. Hear and understand what he or she has to say; and, b. Have him or her leave the conversation feeling they had your total and complete attention.. .the impact is for the person to feel that they were the most important person in the room.
  6. Intensity of focus. Be very, very serious about achieving excellence in your realm of responsibility. Never accept second-best … and if it happens regardless, have a plan to fix it. Remember the parable of the farmer’s cow in the ditch. The three-step process is:

a. First – get the cow out of the ditch.

b. Second – Figure out how the cow got in the ditch.

c. Third – Create and implement a plan so it can never happen again.

Most people do #1…and maybe #2. People that are serious about excellence take the time to do all three!

OK – these are six characteristics of successful people in their own words. See if you agree…and to what degree do you possess and practice them!

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Don’t Let Your Quest for Success Lead You Into “Resume and/or Interview Fraud”

Don’t let your quest for success lead you Into “Resume and/or Interview Fraud”!!

The fall from grace not too long ago of former Yahoo CEO Scott Thompson points out something recruiters have known since the resume was invented – a significant percentage of resumes are fraudulent – as was Thompson’s.

Scott Thompson

Scott Thompson

A person’s resume is one thing over which they have TOTAL control. Therefore, there are NO excuses for Scott Thompson’s resume claiming a degree in computer science – which he didn’t have. He lost his job after 130 days at Yahoo.

The very same is true of YOUR resume… it is your work product …you are 100% responsible for its content!

Resume fraud comes in two flavors:

  • Errors of omission – hiding gaps in your work history or otherwise not revealing information that is part of the big picture regarding your background and qualifications.
  • Errors of commission – claiming a non-existent degree, a job title you didn’t have or accomplishments that weren’t yours.

Two other examples of well-known professionals that should have known better:

George O'Leary

George O’Leary

George O’Leary and Ronnie Few. Who?? George O’Leary’s dream job was to be Notre Dame’s head football coach. And he was. For five days in 2001. He claimed to have a master’s degree and to have played college football for three years… but neither were true. Bye – bye George.

few_ronnie_official_photo

Ronnie Few

Ronnie Few was Washington, D.C. Fire Chief beginning in 2000 for 22 months….until it was discovered that he lied about his professional and educational achievements in his resume. Bye-bye Ronnie. The list goes on and on of professionals well up the ladder of success who lost their jobs and creditability over fraudulent resumes.

So – how do employers guard against hiring someone with a ponied up resume?

They verify, verify and verify. A strong reference check will verify every degree and every professional affiliation. Modern search engines and internet search capability can lead prospective employers to the truth in a number of ways.

They look for red flags. Employers look for things that don’t make sense. They look for inconsistencies in stories, experiences and anecdotes. For hires of any significance, multiple interviews by several interviewers is the norm. Interviewers will compare notes to see if things mesh or not. If it doesn’t smell right – they will keep digging. If it doesn’t add up… they just pass on your candidacy.

They will do a Google search on your name. They will search on your full name (e.g. – Robert Harris) and your nickname (e.g. – Bob Harris). They will also search social networking sites as well such as LinkedIn and Google+. The questions is – what will they find there that will not hurt you, but rather help you?

The title above includes “interview fraud”. What is that you ask? Simply put, it is you making incorrect and misleading statements in an interview. If it is on your resume, you will probably be asked about it… in which case you will make statements that at the least “puff” your credentials and at the worst are incorrect .These incorrect and misleading statements will hurt you just as much as a fraudulent resume will once they come to light… and come to light they will with diligent interviewers!

In summary, resume fraud is more common than you would think.. so make sure your resume and interview is 100% truthful!! Don’t follow in the footsteps of Scott, George and Ronnie!!

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Does your Resume “Mirror”?

Don’t Let your Resume Do You In!

The process of screening resumes more and more is being done by scanners looking for specific descriptive words and phrases detailing specific areas of expertise and/or experience. The odds are that this is certainly true for many large organizations and sample resumemany of those that ask you to submit your resume via a web portal.

What does this mean for you?

It means that you need to write your resume to include the EXACT words and descriptive phrases that are found in the job listing or ad. As noted in Chapter 7 (Your Resume: The Key to Your Next Job – Better Get it Right!), every resume submitted needs to be custom written to present your credentials truthfully yet be in sync with what the organization is seeking. It needs to be as perfect a match as can be… word – wise. You may be 100% qualified for the job in question but never make the cut to get that telephone call if the resume screening process includes looking for key words or phrases that are not in your resume!

Website designers know that for a website to be included in the results of a particular internet search, the website in question must contain key words appropriate to the search.

For example, the NRI Staffing Resources’ website includes all of the possible job titles and skill sets appropriate to NRI’s four areas of specialization (accounting/finance, legal, healthcare, office admin/clerical). This tactic increases the chances of an internet search for a job in any of these four areas will bring up the NRI website.

The same principle applies to your resume; rather than trying to get a hit on a search engine, you want a hit on a scanner looking for certain key words and phrases! So it is absolutely necessary that the EXACT words and phrases that detail the desired credentials of the candidate to be hired… be in your resume! Your resume needs to “mirror” the job listing or ad!

What if you are conducting a campaign rather than replying to a specific ad or job posting? Do a search to find an previous ad or job posting for the position you are seeking and include those key words and phrases. If you can’t find an appropriate ad, look to the organization’s mission statement for any descriptive words or phrases that detail the organization’s values, etc. The point is if your resume is to be screened via a scanner, you really need to have the right words and phrases within it. So – think creatively!

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Want to be a Great Leader?

Success comes to those that learn and grow. Preparing yourself for the next step in your career is critical to achieving not only that next job… but the one after that.

This involves thinking and learning. If you desire to be a good leader of people – even a great leader of people – you need to really understand what leadership is all about. The libraries are full of books on leadership and new ones are hitting the street regularly. Yet, the basic principles remain the same. A brief self-analysis on your part will be helpful to gauge where you are on the leadership path.

george-hw-bush-pictureThe following is a re-print (with permission from NRI, Inc.) of one of the essays I wrote for NRI’s “Managing for Excellence” series. To what extent can you grade yourself B+ or better on the following six aspects of leadership?

Want to be a Great Leader?

A Leader Whose People Will Always Deliver the Goods?

The principles are simple and easy. Mastering them and then living them to a high degree is not so easy. Successful people have a healthy degree of humility and self-doubt that keeps them doing tough self-evaluations. As Mitch Fromstein – the late CEO of Manpower –  used to say: “great managers sweat the small stuff”. Sooner or later you’ll make enough mistakes to really learn what follows. The key is to learn them before the mistakes become job-ending ones.

1. Be an expert delegator. Understand that to delegate effectively you need to be specific about what the expectations are… the desired results. You need to be confident that whomever you have delegated to do a task or project has the capability to do so… and the tools and resources to do so. And once delegated – don’t meddle. Get progress reports, but don’t tell staff “how to do it” unless it is clearly going poorly.

2. Make sure your expectations are clear to all. And those expectations are two-fold: yours as a boss and those of the organization. Remember that “he who aims at nothing is likely to hit it!” All who look to you as a leader need to know what is expected of them and how it all fits together to achieve the organization’s objectives. Re-state those expectations periodically; they will fade from staff’s memory if not re-stated in the right context.

3. Never take credit for success – give it to others. Remember the words of President George H.W. Bush –  “mother would lecture us – “give the other guy credit. Nobody likes a braggadocio, George. Don’t talk about yourself all the time.” Wise words for us all. Recognize immediately and publically when people rise to the occasion. Recognize incremental success; not everyone will hit a home run every time… and there are times when effort also counts and also needs to be recognized.

4. It is indeed true that honesty is the best policy. Managers and leaders are judged daily by what they do and say. Straight talk and being forthcoming is critical for people to trust you. Trust lost is virtually impossible to regain. That is not to say that there isn’t a time for ambiguity – there is…but never downright dishonesty.

Hellmans Mayo Lid5. Don’t come unglued. Keeping your cool is critical to being a great boss and leader. Remember the directions on a jar of Hellman’s mayonnaise …. “keep cool – but do not freeze”!  Keep your eye on the target…the big picture….and remember that people are looking at youand to you for guidance. No one has confidence in a boss who gets rattled when the going gets tough.

6. Have a sense of humor. Gotta be able to laugh at yourself…. gotta be able to see the irony in things… gotta “lighten up” when it is called for – but never at someone else’s expense. Humor is a universal ice-breaker.

Learn these lessons… put them in practice… coach your subordinates to do the same. Develop a healthy degree of humility and master the process of evaluating how close to the ideal you are in thesesix dynamics. It takes time and discipline to develop the skills to be a great leader so work on it diligently.